Announcing our 2015 workshops!


Hello everyone!
Thanks for checking in with Fun To Teach Happy August, I hope you are feeling happy, re-energized and ready for a super terrific year.
We have packed this post with great information on our upcoming workshops to get you launched into going back to school!  Read on to find out more about our fall workshops



I want you to be the first to know about our new workshop.  Drumroll please

Our New Workshop!
#6 ELD Models and Strategies for Co-Teaching 
- Push-in and Pull-out!
With inclusion on the rise, ELD and Classroom teachers are sharing classrooms more than ever and becoming effective co-teaching partners. Bring your team, co-teacher or just yourself and learn the models for co-teaching.  Understand when and how to use each model for effective instruction to second language learners and low language at risk students.  Find out which strategies are best associated with each model and create make and take activities so you can use them in the classroom the next day!  Engaging, robust English acquisition happens throughout the day when ELD and Classroom teachers team up to enrich each lesson with rigorous language instruction.
Friday October 2, 2015  - Portland, OR
Friday – November 13, 2015 - Lane ESD - Eugene, OR
Friday December 11, 2015 – Bend, Or



This year don't miss out on attending one or our highly motivating and energizing teacher workshops!

Innovative Professional Development for English Language Development Teachers

Our ELD workshops bridge the gap between theory and practice. Our specialty is bringing the how-to, hands-on strategies that practicing ESL teachers need in order to reach demanding academic and language standards.

#4 Academic Language – The Bridge across the Common Core!
What is it?  How to teach it!
ELD & classroom teachers love this workshop as they learn strategies to teach academic language and grammar across the curriculum.  This workshop is of particular value to those participating as a cohort or a grade level co-teaching team.  Explore strategies and activities to build academic language in Intermediate and Early Advanced English language learners, as well as native English speakers.  These strategies are ideal for both push in or pull out programs. 
The following areas will be presented and explored: 
•Phonological Features •Vocabulary and Word Formation •Grammar •Discourse •Cognition 
There is time allotted to create multiple Make and Take projects relating to each category.
Friday – January 22, 2016 - Eugene, OR






#3 Connections between Common Core Language Standards and ELD
CONNECTING THE COMMON CORE LANGUAGE STANDARDS TO ELD
Whether you are in a push-in or pull-out program this Make and Take workshop is for K-5 ELD and/or classroom teachers working separately or as a collaborative team.  Get an in-depth understanding of the Common Core Language Standards and how they correspond with Second language acquisition with this Make and Take workshop.  This presentation concentrates on strategies and make & take activities, which compare the connections between second language learning and the CCSS language standards.
Friday – October 16, 2015 - Portland, OR


#5 Getting To Know The Key Strategies for Teaching English Language Proficiency
Are you ready to get to know the new key strategies that support teaching English Language Proficiency in Oregon?  This workshop explores and clarifies the strategies that support academic language and will bring your understanding and classroom instruction up to speed. Enhance your knowledge of key strategies whether you are brand new to them or already starting to incorporate them into your instruction.

FRIday- September 18, 2015  - Portland, OR

        
 And again!

Our New Workshop!
#6 ELD Models and Strategies for Co-Teaching 
- Push-in and Pull-out!

With inclusion on the rise, ELD and Classroom teachers are sharing classrooms more than ever and becoming effective co-teaching partners. Bring your team, co-teacher or just yourself and learn the models for co-teaching.  Understand when and how to use each model for effective instruction to second language learners and low language at risk students.  Find out which strategies are best associated with each model and create make and take activities so you can use them in the classroom the next day!  Engaging, robust English acquisition happens throughout the day when ELD and Classroom teachers team up to enrich each lesson with rigorous language instruction.
Friday October 2, 2015  - Portland, OR
Friday – November 13, 2015 - Lane ESD - Eugene, OR
Friday December 11, 2015 – Bend, Or




I know that so many of us are learning how to upgrade our practice.  Come learn with us.  I hope to see you this fall!



Happy Teaching,
Lori Wolfe
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Back to School with Second Language Learners in the classroom!


Hello Teachers!
This is a post I wrote for REALLY GOOD STUFF BLOG.
I thought the information was valuable and so I am posting it here!
Happy Teaching!
Lori 
As we head back to our classroom and prepare for a new school year many of us will find English Language Learners (ELLs) on our rosters. I would like to share some ideas used to establish a warm, and supportive learning environment for second language learners.   As teachers we know that creating a safe and secure classroom environment includes such things as:
·      Arrange the classroom in a way to maximize interaction with clear walkways and designated work areas
·      Post student work
·      Display classroom rules and procedures.
·      Model kindness, patience and respect
·      Smile often, laughing with our students and giving explicit positive reinforcement
Ensure a sheltered and supportive classroom for second language learners by including: 
1.   Label the room and classroom objects with word and picture labels.  This helps build vocabulary and helps limited or non-speakers know where things go and what they are called.

2.   Integrate Ells’ first language and culture into my classroom when possible.  Incorporate all students into the classroom by putting up posters, books, songs and pictures of different cultures.


3.   Develop and maintain predictable procedures, schedules and routines.  I model and practice these often during the first weeks of school and adhered to them throughout the year.  Posting a schedule, content and language objectives, rules, lunch menus and bus schedules gives a sense of security to students.  Try to always include pictures and simple wording.

4.    Establish a sense of belonging by seating ELLs in the middle of the room toward the front facing the teacher.  Make regular eye contact.  Some teachers think they should not put second language students on the spot and don’t interact with them.  I feel this allows an ELL to slip to the edges of a classroom, never participating, speaking or learning.

5.   Further that sense of belonging by designing classroom jobs appropriate for ELL students.  There are many classroom jobs that a limited speaker can do such as:  Handing out papers, posting lunch numbers, etc.

Before school starts employ these easy strategies to connect second language learners with the classroom and make all students feel welcome and a member of your community.

Get to know your second language learners as school gets under way.  Try to find out the basic facts about each second language learner in your class.  Do you know whom they live with?  How many siblings or relatives live with them in their home?  How long has he/she lived in the country or was he/she born here?  If the student comes from another country, which one?  What town or city?  What language(s) is spoken at home?  What prior school experience does the student have?  Are they literate in their first language?

Clickto download 2 free handy checklists of the above ideas and strategies.  Follow this easy checklist to be certain to cover all the areas you intend to. 

P.S. A thought on newcomers.  When I have newcomers (students new to my school or to the country) in my classroom I don’t forget to address a human basic need:  safety!   To make the students feel safe and secure assign a peer as the ELLs’ buddy.   Choose peer buddies who know the school and can give the newcomers a tour of the school, rooms, offices, bathrooms and classrooms.  The buddies introduce the newcomers to teachers, staff and aides who need to know that these students are limited or non-English speakers.  This is the first step in providing my students with a safe environment.


 What strategies and activities do you use to design a safe, secure learning environment for your second language learners?  Please share your ideas with us!


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Teachers Pay Teachers Booster Sale




Hello everyone!
August is back to school month!

160 × 200It is time to get inspired and Teachers Pay Teachers is the place to find your inspiration!



August 19th is the One Day Bonus sale at Teachers Pay Teachers.  Click here to go to our store!

Pop over to the Fun To Teach Store and stock up on products that will inspire you and ignite your teaching!

Check out some of our best selling products!
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Formal-and-Informal-Language-413325https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/ESL-ELD-Songs-and-Chants-Volume-I-224849https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Prepositions-Vocabulary-and-Grammar-Unit-472526






Happy summer!

Happy Teaching! 

Lori


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Fun-To-Teach

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Much more on Learning Centers Made Simple!

Hello everyone!

This is part 3 of using centers in your classroom…
Have you wanted to try centers in your classroom, but weren’t sure where to start?  Have you tried centers and not been successful?  If you answered yes to either of these questions, read on and I will try and answer some basic questions teachers often have about  centers.

Welcome to a center-based classroom!
Imagine walking into your classroom and seeing students in small groups working cooperatively. One group sits at a center with the teacher for guided reading instruction. Another group of children work at a theme center sequencing the life cycle of an insect. At the next center, students work together restructuring a story with sentence strips. The teacher signals for attention; the students quiet for directions. Students clean up their centers and rotate to the next center, going right to work.  Centers can be done simply with the helpful hints we give you here. Read on and
make centers a reality in your classroom!

By providing a center-based environment in your classroom, you will be able to give your attention to small groups of children during “guided reading.” Research shows that this small-group instruction is one of the primary components that leads to strong readers. Centers also allow you to teach to all the student levels that are in your classroom. Your choice to run centers in your classroom will also teach your students how to work cooperatively in small groups. Learning centers allow you to teach “responsibility” as students work independently, practicing and
reviewing skills and concepts at each center. 

Q: How does a center-based classroom look?
A: Many teachers use tables and desks against the walls in
their classroom. You can use student desks as a center, too.
During center time, the desks will be empty and small groups of children will be sitting at centers throughout the room. The teacher at guided reading will have her/his back to the wall in order to see all centers at a glance from where she/he sits.


Q: How many adults do I need to run centers in my classroom?

A: Just you! When you teach the routines and procedures of

your centers well, your students will learn how to work without supervision during center time.

Q: How long is center time?
A: That depends on you and on how many centers you have
each day. If you have five groups of students rotating through five centers and spending 15 minutes at each center, then you will need 1 hour and 15 minutes for center time. Six groups of children rotating through six centers will need an hour and a half. Remember to add a little extra time for the rotation of
groups when determining the time you will allot for centers.

Q: When it is time to change centers, how do I get my studentsattention?
A: Ringing a bell or calling out “freeze” or “give me five” are great ways to call your students to attention. Teach your students to “freeze” when the signal is given and to listen for instructions.

Happy Teaching,
Lori

For more in depth information on running centers in an elementary classroom Click Here!



Happy Teaching,






For more in depth information on running centers in an elementary classroom Click Here!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Learning-Centers-Made-Simple-Literacy-Centers-for-Reading-and-Math-191988

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More Learning Centers Made Simple!


Hi everyone,

Let's continue on our discussion on running a center based classroom.  Let's take a look at the answers to some common questions teachers have as they get started!
 Questions and Answers!
Q: What is a center?
A: A center is a physical area in a classroom set aside for a specific
learning purpose. The center has appropriate materials and supplies
so students can work individually or in cooperative groups.
Q: How many students should I put in each group?
A: We recommend three to four students in each group at
each center.
Q: How long do students spend at each center?
A: Twenty to thirty minutes at each center is an adequate
amount of time for students to complete most center activities.
Q: How do students know where to go when it is time to
rotate centers?
A: By teaching and practicing the routines and procedures you
want followed at center time, your students will know what you
want them to do. We suggest you follow a clockwise rotation
pattern to rotate students through centers.


Q: How do I group my students for centers?
A: To teach to the varied levels in all classrooms, we suggest you group your students by reading abilities. By grouping students this way, you can meet the instructional needs of all your students in language arts. Learning centers will allow you to teach to your low, medium, and high ability groups and move everyone forward.

For more in depth information on running centers in an elementary classroom Click Here!


Check in Monday for more insights to running centers in your classroom!

Happy Teaching,



For more in depth information on running centers in an elementary classroom Click Here!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Learning-Centers-Made-Simple-Literacy-Centers-for-Reading-and-Math-191988

Read More »

Learning Centers Made Simple!


Hello everyone!

Have you wanted to try learning centers in your classroom, but weren’t sure where to start?  Have you tried centers and not been successful?  If you answered yes to either of these questions, read on and I will try and answer some basic questions teachers often have about math and literacy centers.


Let's start with the basics!  What does a center-based classroom look like? A well-run center-based classroom will have small groups of children working independently at all of the centers, the teacher leading a small group at the guided reading center and perhaps a parent facilitating another center.  The children will be engaged in the activities, well trained about the procedures, and involved in their own learning.

What's the rationale?
Learning centers facilitate growth and learning!

• Learning centers provide an opportunity for small-group

reading instruction.

• Learning centers enhance student learning.

• Learning centers teach students responsibility.

• Learning centers allow you to teach to a variety of

learning styles.

• Learning centers offer a wider variety of activities for

students to learn from.

• Learning centers allow students to work at their own level

while reviewing and practicing skills.

• Learning centers promote cooperative learning

 Stay tuned for the next post and the answers to some common questions about Learning Centers.
Happy Teaching,






For more in depth information on running centers in an elementary classroom Click Here!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Learning-Centers-Made-Simple-Literacy-Centers-for-Reading-and-Math-191988

Read More »