Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Academic language

Hi everyone,
Academic language is a complex concept and requires teaching students the phonological features of English, vocabulary and word formation rules (Lexical knowledge), grammar, discourse, and cognition.  I wrote a blog post about the difference between academic language and academic vocabulary, what follows is a brief summary.


Academic language is the overriding concept and has the following facets interwoven into it:
·      Vocabulary and word formation includes teaching prefixes, suffixes and roots, tier 1, 2, and 3 words (here is where academic vocabulary comes in), parts of speech, multiple meanings of words and the grammar rules that apply to word formation and usage.
·      Phonological features include the sound patterns and intonation of English.
·      Grammar comprises the correct use, rules, and understanding of the parts of speech, word classes, inflections, increasing word complexity, understanding complex sentence structures and syntax.
·      Discourse entails the ability to use words to organize knowledge and exchange ideas,
·      Cognition encompasses the mental action of thinking, understanding, learning and remembering.
 
Click here to download!

Happy Teaching! Lori

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

ELD Programs

Hi everyone, 

For the last few Wednesdays I have been blogging about the different programs offered to second language learners.

Today let's look at the descriptions of ESL programs.

According to the Oregon Department of Education - Office of Learning - Equity Unit, ESL Programs are described as:


ESL - is a program of techniques, methodology and special curriculum designed to teach ELL students English  language skills, which may include listening, speaking, reading, writing, study skills, content vocabulary, and cultural orientation.  ESL instruction is in English with little or no use of native language.  This may include "push-in" programs as determined appropriate by the district.


ESL Pullout - is used generally in elementary school settings.  Students spend part of the day in a mainstream classroom, and are "pulled out" for a portion of the day to receive instruction in English as a second langauge (ESL).

ESL Class Period - is generally used in middle schools and high schools where students receive ESL instruction during a regular class period and also receive course credit for the class.  Students may be grouped for instruction according to their English language proficiency level.

 
Content Based ESL - is an approach to language instruction that integrates the presentation of topics or task from subject matter classes (e.g. math, social studies) within the context of teaching the English language.

There you have it!   

 

Happy Teaching! 

 

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