February 26, 2012

Tell It Table!

Hi Everyone:
I had some requests for my Tell it Table Headings.
Here it is.  See the previous post for a picture of it in action!
Tell it Table



when?


How many?



opinion
Physical Description
(order of adjectives)



Noun
Reg past tense verbs



size
shape
age
color
texture
materials
















































































































Fill in as the year progresses and as you teach various lessons/units.
Happy Teaching! Lori

February 25, 2012

Adjectives!

Happy Saturday!
I noticed that many of my students struggled with which adjective to use first when describing something and I came up with what I call the Tell It Table.  Kids really get the hang of which adjectives come first and love manipulating language! 

I came across this great list of adjectives from
http://www.momswhothink.com/reading/list-of-adjectives.html 


and thought I would share it with you!

Appearance Adjectives
adorable
beautiful
clean
drab
elegant
fancy
glamorous
handsome
long
magnificent
old-fashioned
plain
quaint
sparkling
ugliest
unsightly
wide-eyed

Color Adjectives
red
orange
yellow
green
blue
purple
gray
black
white

Condition Adjectives
alive
better
careful
clever
dead
easy
famous
gifted
helpful
important
inexpensive
mushy
odd
powerful
rich
shy
tender
uninterested
vast
wrong.

Feelings (Bad) Adjectives
angry
bewildered
clumsy
defeated
embarrassed
fierce
grumpy
helpless
itchy
jealous
lazy
mysterious
nervous
obnoxious
panicky
repulsive
scary
thoughtless
uptight
worried

Feelings (Good) Adjectives
agreeable
brave
calm
delightful
eager
faithful
gentle
happy
jolly
kind
lively
nice
obedient
proud
relieved
silly
thankful
victorious
witty
zealous

Shape Adjectives
broad
chubby
crooked
curved
deep
flat
high
hollow
low
narrow
round
shallow
skinny
square
steep
straight
wide.

Size Adjectives
big
colossal
fat
gigantic
great
huge
immense
large
little
mammoth
massive
miniature
petite
puny
scrawny
short
small
tall
teeny
teeny-tiny
tiny

Sound Adjectives
cooing
deafening
faint
hissing
loud
melodic
noisy
purring
quiet
raspy
screeching
thundering
voiceless
whispering

Time Adjectives
ancient
brief
early
fast
late
long
modern
old
old-fashioned
quick
rapid
short
slow
swift
young

Taste/Touch Adjectives
bitter
delicious
fresh
greasy
juicy
hot
icy
loose
melted
nutritious
prickly
rainy
rotten
salty
sticky
strong
sweet
tart
tasteless
uneven
weak
wet
wooden
yummy

Touch Adjectives
boiling
breeze
broken
bumpy
chilly
cold
cool
creepy
crooked
cuddly
curly
damaged
damp
dirty
dry
dusty
filthy
flaky
fluffy
freezing
hot
warm
wet

Quantity Adjectives
abundant
empty
few
full
heavy
light
many
numerous
sparse
substantial



Happy Teaching! Lori

February 24, 2012

Pronouncing "th" words with "magic ink"

Hi everyone and Happy Friday,
I am posting a photo of a simple chart of "th" words in my room.  After a mini lesson of how to pronounce the "th" in English which includes where to place the tongue, I use this chart as a "ticket out the door" for students.  Students correctly pronounces the words and off they go!  What are your ideas for practicing difficult pronunciation in English?


 We made this chart with "magic ink" and a Q-tip.  Just dilute bleach with water and use a Q-tip as your pen!  The shiny side of the construction paper doesn't work as well as the other side, so check out your "magic ink" before the kids come!
 Happy Teaching! Lori

February 20, 2012

Chart for Beginners

Do you have new beginning language students?
I used this chart to work on school vocabulary with a new student in January.  After the lesson I hung it in the hall and now I use it as a review when we "talk the room" together.  It is a great review activity when I have helpers, because the students know the routine and can direct the helper if the person is new to our classroom!

Happy Teaching! Lori



What charts to you like to use with beginners?

















February 18, 2012

Develop Oral Language with Picture Prompts

Picture prompts are fun and creative ways to get your students talking or writing!  Pictures can add engagement and fun while practicing sequencing, describing and more. 

Here are a few of my favorites!

You can see even more pictures with prompts by clicking over to  The Diary of a Not So Wimpy Teacher and Classroom Magic.  They are co-hosting a linky party where many other bloggers are bringing together their ideas for using picture prompts in their classroom.  Although, they have writing prompts with them it is easy to modify those into oral prompts.  Check at Pinterest for a board dedicated to it here .
Happy Teaching!

Lori

President's Day 2012 - Washington to Obama

Presidents of the United States morphed in sequence from George Washington to President Barack Obama. Pictures of the Presidents were found by library and internet search.
This is a great visual to make the presidents a little more real to your students!

Thanks to
Watch the presidents morph from one to the next, all the way from George Washington to Barack Obama. Perfect for Presidents Day!
Happy Teaching! Lori

February 11, 2012

StoryBuilder for the iPad is worth looking at!

If you haven't had a chance to use Story Builder with your students, now might be the time to give it a try.  This app is perfect for second language learners or any learner who needs oral practice building sentences, telling or recreating a story.  Students are guided through a series of questions about the happenings in a picture.  Students answer using a sentence starter and record their own voice.  They can work on this app independently or in small groups.  Students then can listen to themselves and rerecord their answers, if they want.  At the end of the question series StoryBuilder combines the answers into a story.  Students listen to their own story in their own voice!



An additional feature includes the ability to adjust settings to provide differing levels of student support. Level One questions and sentence starters relate to what a students sees in the image.  This is a perfect level for my Beginning and Early Intermediate language learners.  Level 2 adds questions which require inferences. My Intermediate and Early Advanced speakers find this challenging at first.  Finally, the highest level lets students create their own story without guidance.

 It is very easy to use, even for younger students and the added bonus for students is that kids get to hear their own voice!

Here is what the manufacturer says:
Story Builder is designed to help children accomplish the following educational goals: 1) Improve paragraph formation; 2) Improve integration of ideas; and 3) Improve higher level abstractions by inference. Extensive use of audio clips promotes improved auditory processing for special needs children with autism spectrum disorders or sensory processing disorders.

Story Builder offers a rich and fun environment for improving the ability to create a narrative.

FEATURES
-Record feature allows students to record narrative in their own voice
-3 levels of play
-Simple and intuitive interface to record narrative
-Recorded answers are stitched together to create complete narrative
-Stories can be archived for later play
-Each student gets their own archive page
-Stories can be emailed
-50 distinct story lines to create narrative from
-500 audio clips of questions to guide narrative
-Optional question text and answer introduction reinforcement


I have used the free version of Story Builder for a couple of years and loved it so much I just bought 3 more of their other apps. 
Question Builder for iPad
SentenceBuilder™ for iPad
I will review them after I have had a chance to use them more, but so far I like what I see.
LanguageBuilder for iPad














I also noticed that the following 2 apps are available.  They are on my wish list!

ConversationBuilder™PrepositionBuilder™











Has anyone used any of these apps?  Let us know how you use them in your class and what you think about them!
Happy Teaching!
Lori

February 3, 2012

Free Language Stuff

Today Robin P. sent along this great website for ELD teachers
This site is authored by a speech pathologist named Paul Morris.  He has divided all of his free activities into categories that range between function and form.

There is really a lot on this site to explore.

I few of the items I really like are his comprehension cards and graphic organizers for similarities and differences.  I also will be using his pictures that help students use "with".

Here is a preview of his home page:


  1. Welcome to Free Language Stuff!
Filed under: Uncategorized — Paul @ 4:10 pm
Here you can find hundreds of language worksheets and activities in more than 20 areas.  To view activities and other information in each language area click on the appropriate button below.  Many of the activities have been sorted by type to the right.  New activities are posted on the front page, and on area pages.  My profile can be found here.


By clicking on the following buttons you can access information in each area, including detailed word lists, teaching ideas, worksheets, and more!


Take some time to check this out and  let me know which activities you like!

Happy Teaching! Lori

February 2, 2012

The Art of Teaching Second Language Learners

Hi everyone, 
I wanted to share this with you all.  It is a quick read that reminds us of the roles that classroom teachers and ELD teachers have in educating second language learners!  If you want to download it for free, go to my TPT store by clicking here.  It really does take a team! 
Happy Teaching!
Lori

The 4 D's: Demographics/Definitions/Decrees/Development
Demographics: Did you know that English language learners (ELLs) comprise approximately 10% of the students in the United States? That's over 5.1 million students!

Definitions: Although each state creates its own exact definition, the federal government gives us this general definition: An ELL is a student who comes from a language background other than English and whose limited comprehension of English is sufficient to create academic difficulties.

Decrees:  According to NCLB ELLs must meet two criteria: 1) learn English and 2) meet grade level content requirements.

Development: It takes two to tango! Classroom teachers are responsible for the content learning of their ELLs. English Language Development teachers are responsible for English proficiency. More specifically, ELD teaches the English that students need to be successful in schools but will not learn during the rest of their school day.

Here are some tried and true strategies from both the content teacher's and the ELD teacher's point of view:


Student Interaction: Kids need to talk!

Content teacher: Provide authentic opportunities for your student to express their learning.

ELD teacher: Provide structured language practice that practices specific structures in English.


The 4 Modalities: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Content teacher: Reading and writing provide the bulk of instruction with speaking is the culminating event: a speech or presentation

ELD teacher: Speaking provides the bulk of instruction with writing is usually the culminating event.



Classification: Our brains are pattern seekers.

Content teacher: Graphic organizers are the best of the best practices. Use them as often as you can!


ELD teacher:  Organize your instruction by function, form, and classes (vehicles, bathroom vocabulary, prepositions).  When the classification is built in students have a framework for the new vocabulary and grammar structures.



Routine:   Create a learning environment.  Students are ready to learn when they know the schedule.

Content teacher: Be predictable!  Set a schedule and stick to it.  Teach routines and procedures.


ELD teacher:  With routines and procedures well rehearsed your students will be ready to learn and you will make the most from your precious ELD time.



Visuals and Manipulatives:  Concrete and image based teaching makes the content accessible to ELLs.

Content teacher: Use math manipulative materials, word walls with pictures, real objects (realia), provide pictorial cues along with word cues, graphics, maps, photos, word banks,

ELD teacher: Make it visual.  Oral language development and visuals go hand and hand.



Native Language:  Use native language when possible.

Content teacher: Partner same language students to help with translation, send homework in the native language when possible to connect school and home.

ELD teacher: Cognates, cognates, cognates.  Also see which idioms occur in both English and the students’ native language.



Educating English Language Learners is a team effort.  When the classroom teacher and the ELD teacher collaborate great things happen.

Happy Teaching
Lori Wolfe





Happy Teaching! Lori

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